Venezuelans Continue to Struggle Daily as Water Crisis Struck the Country

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Following the crisis for food and electricity, it seems that the Venezuelans’ daily struggles aren’t done yet as they are now facing nationwide water shortage. Jakeline Moncada, a 43-year-old mother of three, has been seen busy alongside her teenage son wading through the muddy bank in the hopes of fetching some usable water they may use for cooking, bathing, and even drinking.

“It’s unfair to think that Venezuela is such a rich country, but here we are struggling with the resources we’re supposed to have”, said Moncada.

Though rich in oil, Venezuela suffered from a major breakdown of basic services, making the once-hard life of the citizens even harder. There has been increasing cases of malnourishment among children, and doctors observe a major outbreak of infections.

Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro says that all those problems stemmed from the opposition’s plans of sabotaging the government. Along with the backing of US officials, the opposition is targeting the Venezuelan government and blaming such downfall to the corruption and mismanagement displayed by Maduro and Hugo Chavez, his predecessor.

Caught in the middle of such conflict are ordinary citizens who have suffered major shortages in more than 2 weeks now. The heavy water crisis prompted citizens to go outside their houses and search for any possible water sources, regardless if it’s potable or not.

The country has seen both children and adult carrying with them empty buckets, heading towards public fountains and just about anywhere water can be seen, even in stinky urban wells. Maria Eugenia Landaeta of the University of Hospital of Caracas’ infectious disease department stated that there has been an alarming rate of diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever throughout the nation.

The country’s already suffering from malnourishment, famine, and medical shortages. However, if access to clean, potable water is not restored, then the entire country will suffer from possibly uncontrollable cases of bacterial and gastrointestinal infections, Landaeta said.

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